History

A History of Trees and People

Since our inception in 1992, we have:

  • Worked with over 3,000 volunteers to plant 9,000 new trees
  • Coordinated educational programs with area schools and community groups, including Birch Lane, Cesar Chavez, North Davis, Patwin, Pioneer and Willett Elementary Schools, Holmes Junior High, Emerson Junior High, Davis High School, Davis School for Independent Study, UC Davis, University Extension, the Yolo Basin Foundation, the Boy and Girl Scouts, and the Davis Rotary Club.
  • Established a partnership with the City of Davis Parks and Community Services Department, Tree Commission, and Tree Maintenance Division to involve Davis citizens in the planting and maintenance of our urban forest.
  • Published a quarterly newsletter, Branching Out, and educational brochures on tree planting, tree establishment, and selecting quality nursery stock.
  • Coordinated the volunteer activities for the 1998 national Make a Difference Day tree planting at the Vic Fazio Wildlife Area where 200 volunteers helped plant 3,600 native California trees and shrubs.
  • Planted and maintained a 3.2 mile Adopt-a-Highway site on State Highway 113.
  • Sponsored free community workshops on tree care, planting, maintenance, and urban forestry/environmental education.

Our goals for the future…

One of Tree Davis Founders, State Senator Lois Wolk, speaking Arbor day 2006

One of Tree Davis’ Founders, State Senator Lois Wolk, speaking Arbor day 2006

As our success grows, so do the expectations of the community. Future projects include parking lot shade monitoring, an ongoing series of free tree care workshops, and our tree care partnership with the City of Davis.

We are committed to educating the public about trees because we view urban and community forestry as an integral part of a healthy environment. Teaching people to plant and care for trees increases environmental awareness and empowers our citizens as stewards of our community, country, and planet. Planting a tree is much more than a fun outdoor activity. It reduces pollution, provides cooling shade on a summer’s day, brings neighbors together, increases property values, reduces crime, fosters community cooperation, and provides habitat for local wildlife.

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